Services

Dr. Sayeed has developed a minimal blood loss surgery protocol for total joint replacement procedures. With the use of advanced surgical devices for coagulation and the use of tranexamic acid, blood loss and the need for transfusions have been significantly reduced. This is a state of the art technique for patients and is offered at all of Dr. Sayeed’s surgical locations.

Hip

The hip is one of the body’s largest joints. It is a ball-and-socket joint. The socket is formed by the acetabulum, which is part of the large pelvis bone. The ball is the femoral head, which is the upper end of the femur (thighbone).

The bone surfaces of the ball and socket are covered with articular cartilage, a smooth tissue that cushions the ends of the bones and enables them to move easily.

A thin tissue called synovial membrane surrounds the hip joint. In a healthy hip, this membrane makes a small amount of fluid that lubricates the cartilage and eliminates almost all friction during hip movement. Bands of tissue called ligaments (the hip capsule) connect the ball to the socket and provide stability to the joint.

If your knee is severely damaged by arthritis or injury, it may be hard for you to perform simple activities, such as walking or climbing stairs. You may even begin to feel pain while you are sitting or lying down.

If nonsurgical treatments like medications and using walking supports are no longer helpful, you may want to consider total knee replacement surgery. Joint replacement surgery is a safe and effective procedure to relieve pain, correct leg deformity, and help you resume normal activities.

Whether you have just begun exploring treatment options or have already decided to have total knee replacement surgery, this article will help you understand more about this valuable procedure.

Knee

Shoulder

Your shoulder is made up of three bones: your upper arm bone (humerus), your shoulder blade (scapula), and your collarbone (clavicle).

The head of your upper arm bone fits into a rounded socket in your shoulder blade. This socket is called the glenoid. A combination of muscles and tendons keeps your arm bone centered in your shoulder socket. These tissues are called the rotator cuff.

There are two joints in the shoulder, and both may be affected by arthritis. One joint is located where the clavicle meets the tip of the shoulder blade (acromion). This is called the acromioclavicular (AC) joint. Where the head of the humerus fits into the scapula is called the glenohumeral joint.

To provide you with effective treatment, your physician will need to determine which joint is affected and what type of arthritis you have.

Total knee & hip replacements are two of the most successful procedures in all of medicine. In the vast majority of cases, it enables people to live richer, more active lives free of chronic knee / hip pain. Over time, however, a knee or hip replacement may fail for a variety of reasons. When this occurs, your knee or hip can become painful and swollen. It may also feel stiff or unstable, making it difficult to perform your everyday activities.

Shoulder replacement is also one of the most successful procedures in all of medicine. In the vast majority of cases, Shouler replacement enables people to live more active lives without debilitating pain. Over time, however, a replacement can fail for a variety of reasons. When this occurs, your shoulder can become painful and may also feel stiff.

Revision Surgery

Other Services Provided

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General Orthopaedics

Orthopaedic Trauma

Orthopaedic Sports Medicine

Arthroscopically Assisted Orthopaedic Surgery

Arthritis Management To Include Operative Techniques

Operative Management of Avascular Necrosis/Osteonecrosis